The Cost of Opportunity

commoditiesWe’ve all heard it so many times that we don’t even notice it anymore:  Education is a commodity.  College is an investment in your own human capital. Students are consumers, savvy individuals who bear the risks and rewards of their own investments.  Student loans are the cost of opportunity.

But this familiar “Education is a Commodity” refrain is not a benign turn of phrase.    Using the language of the market to describe higher education is driving the disastrous rise in student debt.

Why?  Because we can draw a direct line between Continue reading

Putting the Community Back in College

public croppedCommunity colleges have been much in the news since President Obama proposed free tuition for millions of students. This plan isn’t cheap and states will have to change their spending habits to reap the benefits of expanded community college for all.  They’ll need to invest considerable sums to both match the President’s proposal, and reverse historic declines in state funding so that they have the capacity to serve millions of new students.

But why should states invest in community colleges instead of relying on for-profit schools to fill the gaps, as they have done for the past decade?

Community colleges train students for much lower tuition than for-profit schools.  Students can get a comparable (or better) education for a fraction of the cost, leading to much lower rates of student debt.  This justifies some measure of state investment, if only to keep the scourges of high debt burden and default from ruining the lives of local students.

Community colleges also offer community benefits that for-profit schools do not. 

These institutions are not just “tickets to the middle class” Continue reading

Pay-it-Forward: The New Liberal Rorschach Test

Pay-it-Forward plans are sweeping through state legislatures like so many summer wildfires.  Monica Potts over at American Prospect explores if the hot-idea-with-a-catchy-title is a progressive alternative to unsupportable levels of student debt, or a wolf in sheep’s clothing that will only further erode support for public funding of higher education.  (SPOILER ALERT: Maybe both at the same time?)

Oregon has already passed a pilot program, and legislators in Washington state and and Ohio are pushing to follow suit.