The Cost of Opportunity

commoditiesWe’ve all heard it so many times that we don’t even notice it anymore:  Education is a commodity.  College is an investment in your own human capital. Students are consumers, savvy individuals who bear the risks and rewards of their own investments.  Student loans are the cost of opportunity.

But this familiar “Education is a Commodity” refrain is not a benign turn of phrase.    Using the language of the market to describe higher education is driving the disastrous rise in student debt.

Why?  Because we can draw a direct line between Continue reading

In my day we worked our way through college…

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel notes that working your way though a four year public institution, even in a low-cost city, would be impossible at minimum wage.

“In 1978, a UW-Madison student paying his or her own way, without any help, had to earn $2,362. It could be done at minimum wage by working full-time through the summer and about 10 hours a week through the academic year, or a total 891 hours.  Today, a full-time UW-Madison student going it alone couldn’t physically work enough hours at minimum wage to earn $18,402 for tuition, fees, room and board. It would take 2,538 hours, or about 50 hours per week for 50 weeks.”

How are you paying for school?

The National Center for Education Statistics released the results of its 2011-2012 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, a survey that measures how students and their families are paying for higher education.  The AP’s summary of the study (find it here in the Washington Post) emphasizes that increased federal grants are not enough to offset the double whammy of declining state and school aid and rising tuition.